By Rachel Jones

“The New Colossus” by Marshall Goldberg

The New Colossus by Marshall Goldberg

Photography: Michael Fornataro

Nellie Bly was not only a revolutionary reporter, but she was also the inspiration for “The New Colossus.” The historical mystery, written by local author Marshall Goldberg, follows Bly’s investigation of a possible murder in 1880s New York City. The victim? Emma Lazarus, the poet of “The New Colossus,” which is displayed on the Statue of Liberty. Goldberg, a television writer of 25 years, crafted the novel with only real people and events, so it would read as nonfiction. “My ultimate goal, besides to tell a good tale, was to make people feel like they were in the middle of a story in the 1880s.”

Order the book in print, audio, or e-book versions at Barnes and Noble or Amazon.com.

“Swing” by Philip Beard

Swing: A Novel by Philip Beard

Cover design: Amy C. King

In his third and most accomplished novel, “Swing,” Philip Beard introduces us to John Kostka and Henry Graham. The first, a legless veteran who travels by gloved hands and powerful arms. The second, a 10-year-old boy who recently lost his father. When they meet at a bus stop in Downtown Pittsburgh, the two seem to only share a love of the 1971 Pittsburgh Pirates. But as their friendship grows, they realize it is more than baseball that connects them; it’s something strong enough to heal old wounds and deep enough to last a lifetime.

Purchase “Swing” at Barnes & Noble and Penguin Bookshop, or download it from any major e-book sellers.

“Bodiography Movement Therapy” by Maria Caruso

Bodiography Movement Therapy by Maria Caruso

Photography: Maria Caruso

Maria Caruso knows the positive effects physical movements can have on our mental states. To share her message, the artistic and executive director of the Bodiography Movement Therapy System is offering to train others in her research-based process — no dance background required! Caruso’s new book, “Bodiography Movement Therapy: The Healing Power of Dance and Movement for EveryBODY,” serves as a manual to facilitators and works with the training sessions that begin this fall. Caruso hopes “the Bodiography Movement Therapy system can be used for the betterment of the community, and in the name of both healing and preventative care.”

For more information, visit bodiographycbc.com.
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